Wisconsin sets new records for cases, deaths and hospitalizations

MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – After two days reporting less than 5,000 new coronavirus cases, the coronavirus crisis in Wisconsin jumped back up Tuesday with new one-day records in cases, deaths and hospitalizations.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported 7,073 confirmed cases, 66 deaths, and 291 hospitalizations for COVID-19 in its daily report.

The state received 19,999 test results in the last 24-hour period. The 7,073 positive tests were 35.37% of the results — known as the positivity rate. The remaining 12,926 tests came back negative. The 7-day and 14-day averages for the positivity rate reached new all-time highs of 34.51% and 33.26%, respectively. Even counting all tests, including people tested multiple times, the positivity rate is at an all-time high of 18.1%, according to the DHS. Health experts need to see the positivity rate at 5% or less to consider the virus being managed.

The 66 deaths added Tuesday is almost as many as the last 3 days combined, and passes the record 64 deaths added on October 27. The death rate held steady at .86% of all known coronavirus cases. The 7-day average for deaths is 42, which is an all-time high.

Deaths were reported in 31 of Wisconsin’s 72 counties, with 12 of them reporting multiple COVID-19 deaths: Barron (3), Brown (4), Dane, Dodge (2), Eau Claire (4) Fond du Lac, Grant, Iowa (2), Jefferson, Juneau, La Crosse, Langlade (6), Marathon (7), Marinette, Menominee, Milwaukee (7), Oconto, Outagamie, Racine (2), Rusk, Shawano, Sheboygan (3), St. Croix, Trempealeau, Vernon, Washington (2), Waukesha, Waupaca (3), Waushara, Winnebago and Wood counties.

There have now been 2,395 deaths from COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. COVID-19 is catching up to the 2,453 Alzheimer’s disease deaths in 2018 to become the 6th leading cause of death in Wisconsin less than 8 months, compared with CDC mortality data for an entire year. Wisconsin reported the first two COVID-19 deaths on March 19.

County-by-county case numbers will be updated later in this article.

Almost 62,000 people in Wisconsin (61,944) are active cases right now. They were diagnosed in the last 30 days, since October 11, and weren’t medically cleared. That’s 22.2% of all cases dating back to February 5. There are 214,469 people who are considered recovered, which is down to 76.9% of all cases in the last 9 months.

Since February, 13,230 people have been hospitalized for serious symptoms of the COVID-19 virus. That’s 4.7% of all known cases, which is a decline from 4.8% Monday.

The Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) Monday afternoon reported 2,003 COVID-19 patients currently hospitalized — shattering the record 1,860 set Sunday to go over 2,000 for the first time — but the number of those in intensive care declined by 1, to 396. We’ll be looking for an update to these figures later this afternoon. Hospitalization figures take deaths and hospital discharges into account.

HOSPITAL READINESS

Also Monday, the WHA reported 163 ICU beds are open in the state’s 134 hospitals, or 11.1% of the total 1,469 ICU beds. Overall, 11.9% of the state’s hospital beds are open, counting ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation.

The Fox Valley region, which has 13 hospitals, has 10 open ICU beds, or 9.6%. The hospitals are treating 134 COVID-19 patients, including 20 in intensive care. Overall, 8.2% of hospital beds are open in those 8 counties.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals have 15 open ICU beds, which is 7.2% of all hospital beds. Overall, 17.1% of all hospital beds are open in those 7 counties.

Hospitals have been able to catch up on medical supplies. Monday, only 1 or 2 hospitals had less than a week’s supply in any category of personal protective equipment, including N95 masks, gowns, paper medical masks or goggles.

TUESDAY’S UPDATE IN PROGRESS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold)*

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 751 cases (+18) (6 deaths)
  • Ashland – 429 cases (+13) (5 deaths)
  • Barron – 1,991 cases (+72) (14 deaths) (+3)
  • Bayfield – 431 cases (+27) (3 deaths)
  • Brown – 18,244 cases (+266) (115 deaths) (+4)
  • Buffalo – 466 cases (+21) (3 deaths)
  • Burnett – 434 cases (+28) (7 deaths)
  • Calumet – 3,273 cases (+41) (18 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 2,984 cases (+184) (31 deaths)
  • Clark –1,365 cases (+45) (23 deaths)
  • Columbia – 2,404 cases (+76) (9 deaths)
  • Crawford – 541 cases (+35) (1 death)
  • Dane – 19,494 cases (+697) (56 deaths) (+1)
  • Dodge – 5,912 cases (+72) (46 deaths) (+2)
  • Door – 1,230 cases (+24) (10 deaths)
  • Douglas – 1,097 cases (+50) (1 death)
  • Dunn – 1,628 cases (+41) (1 death)
  • Eau Claire – 5,223 cases (+92) (35 deaths) (+4)
  • Florence – 258 cases (+5) (8 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 6,433 cases (+213) (27 deaths) (+1)
  • Forest – 599 cases (+17) (11 deaths)
  • Grant – 2,512 cases (+46) (47 deaths) (+1)
  • Green – 1,247 cases (+23) (5 deaths)
  • Green Lake – 953 cases (+25) (4 deaths)
  • Iowa – 804 cases (+43) (4 deaths) (+2)
  • Iron – 274 cases (+8) (5 deaths)
  • Jackson – 931 cases (+21) (2 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 3,715 cases (+78) (27 deaths) (+1)
  • Juneau – 1,357 cases (+75) (6 deaths) (+1)
  • Kenosha – 7,096 cases (+188) (96 deaths)
  • Kewaunee – 1,333 cases (+36) (11 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 5,626 cases (+91) (27 deaths) (+1)
  • Lafayette – 745 cases (+18) (2 deaths)
  • Langlade – 1,252 cases (+28) (19 deaths) (+6)
  • Lincoln – 1,336 cases (+52) (14 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 3,674 cases (+73) (21 deaths)
  • Marathon – 7,096 cases (+238) (82 deaths) (+7)
  • Marinette – 2,242 cases (+27) (20 deaths) (+1)
  • Marquette – 856 cases (+14) (6 deaths)
  • Menominee – 427 cases (+18) (2 deaths) (+1)
  • Milwaukee – 51,109 (+1,082) (630 deaths) (+7)
  • Monroe – 1,632 cases (+25) (8 deaths)
  • Oconto – 2,599 cases (+59) (20 deaths) (+1)
  • Oneida – 1,647 cases (+43) (19 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 11,332 cases (+142) (87 deaths) (+1)
  • Ozaukee – 3,260 cases (+100) (27 deaths)
  • Pepin – 269 cases (+14)
  • Pierce – 1,119 cases (+35) (7 deaths)
  • Polk – 1,003 cases (+42) (3 deaths)
  • Portage – 3,537 cases (+46) (28 deaths)
  • Price – 492 cases (+6) (3 deaths)
  • Racine – 9,820 cases (+176) (126 deaths)
  • Richland – 602 cases (+13) (10 deaths)
  • Rock – 6,747 cases (+138) (55 deaths) (+1)
  • Rusk – 383 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Sauk – 2,515 cases (+64) (9 deaths)
  • Sawyer – 512 cases (+8) (4 deaths)
  • Shawano – 3,001 cases (+30) (38 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 6,122 cases (+123) (32 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 2,712 cases (+91) (14 deaths)
  • Taylor – 694 cases (+14) (10 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 1,386 cases (+22) (6 deaths)
  • Vernon – 686 cases (+18) (2 deaths)
  • Vilas – 830 cases (+11) (8 deaths)
  • Walworth – 4,184 cases (+67) (39 deaths)
  • Washburn – 339 cases (+8) (2 deaths)
  • Washington – 5,943 cases (+87) (50 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 15,929 cases (+315) (147 deaths) (+1)
  • Waupaca – 3,001 cases (+19) (56 deaths)
  • Waushara – 1,489 cases (+13) (5 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 10,621 cases (+123) (82 deaths) (+3)
  • Wood – 2,545 cases (+88) (15 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula**

  • Alger – 112 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Baraga – 176 cases (+14) (4 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 168 cases (+13)
  • Delta – 1,571 cases (+69) (42 deaths) (+6)
  • Dickinson – 936 cases (+26) (25 deaths) (+1)
  • Gogebic – 415 cases (+22) (6 deaths)
  • Houghton – 945 cases (+20) (8 deaths)
  • Iron – 532 cases (+25) (24 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 27 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Luce – 8- cases (+3)
  • Mackinac – 150 cases (+4)
  • Marquette – 1,393 cases (+242) (19 deaths)
  • Menominee – 834 cases (+18) (7 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 190 cases (+12) (1 death)
  • Schoolcraft – 126 cases (+3)

* Viewers have asked us why the state has different numbers than what’s reported on some county health department websites. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19 but would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Health experts say face masks are still the most effective way the general public can slow the spread of the coronavirus, but only if the masks are worn appropriately — over the nose and chin. County and state health officials are reminding and urging people to stay home when they feel sick, avoid large gatherings, and distance yourself six feet from people who aren’t from your household.

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services has a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. The tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.


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