Wisconsin reports fewer than 5,000 new coronavirus cases for 2nd day in a row

MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – For a second day in a row Monday, Wisconsin reported less than 5,000 new coronavirus cases and fewer than 20 COVID-19 deaths.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services received 14,077 test results and 4,360 — about 3 in 10 — were positive. The remaining 9,717 were negative. Only Kewaunee County did not have a new case.

These results are good news after this weekend. Over the weekend, Wisconsin shattered the one-day record of 6,141 cases Friday with 7,065 new cases on Saturday and 7-day average positivity rate (34.48%).

However, the results weren’t good enough to slow the rise in other key metrics: The 7-day average for new cases is up to 5,639 a day; the 14-day average is up to 5,052 new cases per day, the first time that’s been over 5,000; and the 7-day average for deaths reached a new high of 40 COVID-19 deaths per day.

Seventeen deaths added to the report Monday bring the state’s death toll to 2,329. These deaths were reported in Burnett, Chippewa (2), Clark, Dodge, Fond du Lac, Lafayette, Marathon (4), Milwaukee, Rock, Waukesha and Winnebago (3) counties.

County-by-county case numbers are listed later in this article.

COVID-19 is catching up to the 2,453 Alzheimer’s disease deaths in Wisconsin in 2018 to become the 6th leading cause of death in Wisconsin less than 8 months, compared with CDC mortality data for an entire year. Wisconsin reported the first two COVID-19 deaths on March 19.

To date, 4.8% of all known coronavirus cases have resulted in hospitalizations and 0.86% of people have died from the COVID-19 virus.

The U.S. surpassed 10 million coronavirus cases since late January (see related story). According to data collected by Johns Hopkins University, the U.S. currently leads the world in total cases per capita (3,046.8 cases per 100,000 population), followed by Spain (2,844 per 100,000) and France (2,739.6 per 100,000).

The DHS reports almost 60,000 people (59,088) in Wisconsin are considered active cases, meaning they tested positive for the COVID-19 virus in the past 30 days and haven’t been medically cleared. That’s 21.7% of all of Wisconsin’s coronavirus patients since February 5, the same percentage as Sunday. More than 210,000 people (210,318) are now considered recovered, which is also steady at 77.4%.

A total 271,770 people have tested positive for the coronavirus in our state, and 12,939 of them have been hospitalized for serious symptoms of COVID-19.

The state reported 100 more COVID-19 patients were hospitalized in the past 24 hours.

As of Sunday, current hospitalizations were at an all-time high with the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) reporting 1,860 COVID-19 patients currently hospitalized, including 397 in intensive care.

HOSPITAL READINESS

On Saturday, the WHA reported 168 ICU beds are open out of 1,469 ICU beds in the state’s 134 hospitals.

In the Fox Valley region, which has 13 hospitals serving 8 counties, there are 8 ICU beds open – four fewer than Saturday — out of 104 total. Overall, 7.4% of hospital beds are open there. The hospitals are treating 130 COVID-19 patients, 21 in intensive care.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals, serving 7 counties, had 25 of their 207 ICU beds open Sunday. 16.63% of beds are open overall.

The WHA reports 25 of the state’s 134 hospitals had less than a week’s supply of gowns and 13 had a week’s supply of paper medical masks Sunday. Those figures are unchanged since Saturday.

We expect updated numbers later Monday afternoon.

MONDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold)*

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 733 cases (+12) (6 deaths)
  • Ashland – 416 cases (+22) (5 deaths)
  • Barron – 1,919 cases (+58) (11 deaths)
  • Bayfield – 404 cases (+16) (3 deaths)
  • Brown – 17,978 cases (+27) (111 deaths)
  • Buffalo – 445 cases (+4) (3 deaths)
  • Burnett – 406 cases (+4) (7 deaths) (+1)
  • Calumet – 3,232 cases (+64) (18 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 2,800 cases (+47) (31 deaths) (+2)
  • Clark –1,320 cases (+29) (23 deaths) (+1)
  • Columbia – 2,328 cases (+59) (9 deaths)
  • Crawford – 506 cases (+12) (1 death)
  • Dane – 18,797 cases (+274) (55 deaths)
  • Dodge – 5,840 cases (+102) (44 deaths) (+1)
  • Door – 1,206 cases (+29) (10 deaths)
  • Douglas – 1,047 cases (+4) (1 death)
  • Dunn – 1,628 cases (+41) (1 death)
  • Eau Claire – 5,131 cases (+95) (31 deaths)
  • Florence – 253 cases (+4) (8 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 6,220 cases (+110) (26 deaths) (+1)
  • Forest – 582 cases (+5) (11 deaths)
  • Grant – 2,466 cases (+43) (46 deaths)
  • Green – 1,224 cases (+11) (5 deaths)
  • Green Lake – 928 cases (+14) (4 deaths)
  • Iowa – 761 cases (+22) (2 deaths)
  • Iron – 266 cases (+7) (5 deaths)
  • Jackson – 910 cases (+19) (2 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 3,637 cases (+96) (26 deaths)
  • Juneau – 1,282 cases (+27) (5 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 6,518 cases (+100) (96 deaths)
  • Kewaunee – 1,297 cases (11 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 5,535 cases (+66) (26 deaths)
  • Lafayette – 727 cases (+16) (2 death) (+1)
  • Langlade – 1,224 cases (+15) (13 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 1,284 cases (+33) (14 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 3,601 cases (+44) (21 deaths)
  • Marathon – 6,858 cases (+186) (75 deaths) (+4)
  • Marinette – 2,215 cases (+10) (19 deaths)
  • Marquette – 842 cases (+15) (6 deaths)
  • Menominee – 409 cases (+3) (1 death)
  • Milwaukee – 50,027 (+732) (623 deaths) (+1)
  • Monroe – 1,607 cases (+51) (8 deaths)
  • Oconto – 2,540 cases (+29) (19 deaths)
  • Oneida – 1,604 cases (+18) (19 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 11,190 cases (+151) (86 deaths)
  • Ozaukee – 3,160 cases (+67) (27 deaths)
  • Pepin – 255 cases (+6)
  • Pierce – 1,119 cases (+35) (7 deaths)
  • Polk – 1,003 cases (+42) (3 deaths)
  • Portage – 3,537 cases (+46) (28 deaths)
  • Price – 492 cases (+6) (3 deaths)
  • Racine – 9,820 cases (+176) (126 deaths)
  • Richland – 602 cases (+13) (10 deaths)
  • Rock – 6,747 cases (+138) (55 deaths) (+1)
  • Rusk – 383 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Sauk – 2,515 cases (+64) (9 deaths)
  • Sawyer – 512 cases (+8) (4 deaths)
  • Shawano – 3,001 cases (+30) (38 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 6,122 cases (+123) (32 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 2,712 cases (+91) (14 deaths)
  • Taylor – 694 cases (+14) (10 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 1,386 cases (+22) (6 deaths)
  • Vernon – 686 cases (+18) (2 deaths)
  • Vilas – 830 cases (+11) (8 deaths)
  • Walworth – 4,184 cases (+67) (39 deaths)
  • Washburn – 339 cases (+8) (2 deaths)
  • Washington – 5,943 cases (+87) (50 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 15,929 cases (+315) (147 deaths) (+1)
  • Waupaca – 3,001 cases (+19) (56 deaths)
  • Waushara – 1,489 cases (+13) (5 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 10,621 cases (+123) (82 deaths) (+3)
  • Wood – 2,545 cases (+88) (15 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula**

  • Alger – 112 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Baraga – 176 cases (+14) (4 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 168 cases (+13)
  • Delta – 1,571 cases (+69) (42 deaths) (+6)
  • Dickinson – 936 cases (+26) (25 deaths) (+1)
  • Gogebic – 415 cases (+22) (6 deaths)
  • Houghton – 945 cases (+20) (8 deaths)
  • Iron – 532 cases (+25) (24 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 27 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Luce – 8- cases (+3)
  • Mackinac – 150 cases (+4)
  • Marquette – 1,393 cases (+242) (19 deaths)
  • Menominee – 834 cases (+18) (7 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 190 cases (+12) (1 death)
  • Schoolcraft – 126 cases (+3)

* Viewers have asked us why the state has different numbers than what’s reported on some county health department websites. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19 but would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Health experts say face masks are still the most effective way the general public can slow the spread of the coronavirus, but only if the masks are worn appropriately — over the nose and chin. County and state health officials are reminding and urging people to stay home when they feel sick, avoid large gatherings, and distance yourself six feet from people who aren’t from your household.

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services has a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. The tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.


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