New coronavirus record puts Wisconsin over 300,000 cases

MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – Wisconsin identified a record 7,777 new coronavirus cases Friday, putting Wisconsin past the unwanted milestone of 300,000 total cases.

Friday’s total is 280 more than Thursday’s record. The state received a total 18,510 test results and 42% were positive — close to a record positivity rate. The remaining 10,733 tests were negative.

Wisconsin has now had 301,165 confirmed coronavirus cases since February 5. It added 100,000 cases in 18 days, since October 26.

More than 69,000 people who tested positive (69,060) are still considered active cases, meaning they were diagnosed in the past 30 days and haven’t been medically cleared. That’s almost 23% of all the state’s cases (22.9%).

Total coronavirus cases Date reached Days between
301,165 November 5 18 days
201,049 October 26 36 days
101,227 September 20 228 days
1 February 5

Fifty-eight more patients were added to the death toll, bringing that total to 2,573. COVID-19 has now killed more people in Wisconsin in less than 8 months than either stroke, Alzheimer disease, diabetes, the flu and pneumonia, and self-harm killed in all of 2018 (see chart below).

The deaths were reported in 25 counties, including 12 with multiple deaths: Barron, Brown, Chippewa, Clark, Dane (4), Dodge, Eau Claire, Fond du Lac (2), Kenosha (4), Kewaunee, Langlade, Lincoln, Manitowoc (2), Marathon (5), Milwaukee (5), Monroe, Outagamie (5), Pierce (2), Racine (7), Shawano, St. Croix (2), Vernon, Walworth (2), Waukesha (5) and Winnebago counties.

County numbers are listed later this in this article.

The state says 274 more people were hospitalized in the past 24 hours, putting the total number of hospitalizations over 14,000. Since the first patient in Madison on February 5, 14,045 people have been hospitalized, or 4.7% of all known coronavirus cases.

Wisconsin is averaging 6,443 new coronavirus cases a day and 36.15% of tests are coming back positive — both figures are all-time highs.

However, the death rate slipped to 0.85% of all known cases from 0.86%. The 7-day average for deaths went down from 46 to 45 — the first decline for that metric since October 29.

These were the leading causes of death in Wisconsin in 2018, the latest rankings available from the CDC. We inserted COVID-19′s death toll where it would appear in the rankings:

Rank Leading causes of death in Wisconsin (2018) Deaths
1 Heart disease 12,061
2 Cancer 11,457
3 Accidents 3,786
4 Chronic lower respiratory diseases 2,866
COVID-19 2,573
5 Stroke 2,549
6 Alzheimer disease 2,453
7 Diabetes 1,508
8 Influenza/pneumonia 1,075
9 Kidney disease 914
10 Suicide 888

On Thursday, the latest data available until later this afternoon, the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) reported 2,077 COVID-19 patients in the state’s 134 hospitals, with 424 in intensive care units. Changes in hospitalization figures take hospital discharges and deaths into account.

HOSPITAL READINESS

According to the Wisconsin Hospital Association, there are 112 open ICU beds among the state’s 134 hospitals, suggesting 92.4% of the state’s ICU beds are occupied. Overall, 10.3% of the state’s ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation beds are open. Not all of those beds may be available, though, if hospitals don’t have the staff to support them, including doctors, nurses and even food services.

The WHA reports the Fox Valley region only had 3 open ICU beds on Thursday, out of a total 104 ICU beds in the 8-county region’s 13 hospitals. Overall, 5.9% of beds are open. The hospitals are treating 130 COVID-19 patients, including 17 in intensive care.

The Northeast region had 12 out of a total 207 ICU beds open, or 5.8%. Overall, 12.1% of beds are open in the 7-county region’s 10 hospitals. The hospitals are treating 187 COVID-19 patients, including 47 in intensive care.

Statewide, 25 hospitals reported having less than a 7 days’ supply of gowns and 14 reported being low on paper medical masks.

In a news conference Thursday afternoon, Gov. Tony Evers said he plans to release pandemic relief bills next week but didn’t offer any details what they might contain. It’s unclear whether the bills will get any traction in the Republican-controlled Legislature. The last relief bill was passed more than six months ago, and the GOP and its allies have blocked every initiative Evers has enacted to slow the virus’s spread since they successfully sued to overturn the safer-at-home order last spring.

The governor issued a new safer-at-home executive order Tuesday night. Unlike the order overturned by the Wisconsin Supreme Court, this order doesn’t apply to businesses except in urging the public to stay home as much as possible; avoid unnecessary errands or travel; and utilize drive-thru, curbside pick-up and delivery options as much as possible (read details here).

FRIDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold)*

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 821 cases (+36) (6 deaths)
  • Ashland – 476 cases (+18) (5 deaths)
  • Barron – 2,184 cases (+56) (29 deaths) (+1)
  • Bayfield – 487 cases (+20) (3 deaths)
  • Brown – 19,462 cases (+296) (119 deaths) (+1)
  • Buffalo – 538 cases (+31) (3 deaths)
  • Burnett – 500 cases (+27) (7 deaths)
  • Calumet – 3,456 cases (+73) (20 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 3,358 cases (+135) (36 deaths) (+1)
  • Clark – 1,579 cases (+91) (24 deaths) (+1)
  • Columbia – 2,576 cases (+49) (9 deaths)
  • Crawford – 616 cases (+26) (4 deaths)
  • Dane – 21,055 cases (+465) (61 deaths) (+4)
  • Dodge – 6,370 cases (+207) (52 deaths) (+1)
  • Door – 1,333 cases (+45) (10 deaths)
  • Douglas – 1,255 cases (+79) (1 death)
  • Dunn – 1,840 cases (+72) (1 death)
  • Eau Claire – 5,542 cases (+67) (35 deaths) (+1)
  • Florence – 268 cases (+4) (10 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 6,952 cases (+257) (33 deaths) (+2)
  • Forest – 632 cases (+13) (11 deaths)
  • Grant – 2,767 cases (+68) (50 deaths)
  • Green – 1,330 cases (+28) (5 deaths)
  • Green Lake – 1,028 cases (+36) (4 deaths)
  • Iowa – 927 cases (+35) (4 deaths)
  • Iron – 288 cases (+6) (5 deaths)
  • Jackson – 1,116 cases (+89) (2 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 4,024 cases (+77) (29 deaths)
  • Juneau – 1,459 cases (+54) (6 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 7,189 cases (+49) (106 deaths) (+4)
  • Kewaunee – 1,388 cases (+24) (13 deaths) (+1)
  • La Crosse – 6,184 cases (+166) (28 deaths)
  • Lafayette – 836 cases (+12) (2 deaths)
  • Langlade – 1,327 cases (+20) (20 deaths) (+1)
  • Lincoln – 1,455 cases (+63) (14 deaths) (+1)
  • Manitowoc – 3,925 cases (+61) (29 deaths) (+2)
  • Marathon – 7,738 cases (+204) (96 deaths) (+5)
  • Marinette – 2,407 cases (+49) (20 deaths)
  • Marquette – 896 cases (+15) (7 deaths)
  • Menominee – 452 cases (+15) (2 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 54,226 (+1,097) (641 deaths) (+5)
  • Monroe – 1,799 cases (+47) (9 deaths) (+1)
  • Oconto – 2,718 cases (+52) (20 deaths)
  • Oneida – 1,741 cases (+43) (19 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 11,880 cases (+221) (96 deaths) (+5)
  • Ozaukee – 3,646 cases (+133) (29 deaths)
  • Pepin – 318 cases (+18) (1 death)
  • Pierce – 1,362 cases (+84) (7 deaths)
  • Polk – 1,376 cases (+83) (4 deaths)
  • Portage – 3,867 cases (+129) (30 deaths)
  • Price – 553 cases (+11) (3 deaths)
  • Racine – 11,075 cases (+417) (135 deaths) (+7)
  • Richland – 676 cases (+14) (10 deaths)
  • Rock – 7,257 cases (+143) (58 deaths)
  • Rusk – 524 cases (+25) (5 deaths)
  • Sauk – 2,814 cases (+61) (10 deaths)
  • Sawyer – 598 cases (+23) (5 deaths)
  • Shawano – 3,199 cases (+53) (41 deaths) (+1)
  • Sheboygan – 7,115 cases (+265) (41 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 3,165 cases (+134) (18 deaths) (+2)
  • Taylor – 792 cases (+27) (10 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 1,646 cases (+72) (7 deaths)
  • Vernon – 785 cases (+23) (5 deaths) (+1)
  • Vilas – 919 cases (+21) (9 deaths) (+1)
  • Walworth – 4,674 cases (+152) (42 deaths) (+2)
  • Washburn – 409 cases (+27) (2 deaths)
  • Washington – 6,709 cases (+278) (54 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 18,055 cases (+546) (162 deaths) (+5)
  • Waupaca – 3,226 cases (+58) (64 deaths)
  • Waushara – 1,561 cases (+20) (6 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 11,494 cases (+210) (91 deaths) (+1)
  • Wood – 2,960 cases (+152) (16 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula**

  • Alger – 121 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Baraga – 252 cases (5 deaths) (cases revised -3 by state)
  • Chippewa – 217 cases (+26) (2 deaths) (+2)
  • Delta – 1,761 cases (+57) (46 deaths) (+2)
  • Dickinson – 1,153 cases (+50) (26 deaths)
  • Gogebic – 455 cases (+8) (9 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,023 cases (+11) (8 deaths)
  • Iron – 560 cases (+6) (25 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 33 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Luce – 105 cases (+17)
  • Mackinac – 168 cases (+4)
  • Marquette – 1,745 cases (+76) (21 deaths) (+1)
  • Menominee – 939 cases (+16) (10 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 209 cases (+6) (5 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft – 141 cases (+6)

* Viewers have asked us why the state has different numbers than what’s reported on some county health department websites. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19 but would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Health experts say face masks are still the most effective way the general public can slow the spread of the coronavirus, but only if the masks are worn appropriately — over the nose and chin. County and state health officials are reminding and urging people to stay home when they feel sick, avoid large gatherings, and distance yourself six feet from people who aren’t from your household.

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services has a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. The tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.


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