New coronavirus cases below 5,000 for first time in a week

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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – Wisconsin reported the fewest new coronavirus cases in a week Monday, with new cases below 5,000. The latest figures from the Wisconsin Department of Health Services on Monday show 4,389 of the 12,298 tests were positive, for a positivity rate of 35.69% — a rate slightly above the 7-day average. It was the fewest test results the state received in a 24-hour period in two weeks. New cases were reported in 68 of Wisconsin’s 72 counties.

For a second day in a row, the death toll rose by 12 — only the fourth time in two weeks that number has been less than 30. Waupaca accounted for 4 of those deaths. Deaths were also reported in Chippewa (3), Eau Claire (2), Jackson, Kenosha and Lincoln counties. County-by-county case and death totals are listed later in this article.

COVID-19 has now claimed 2,649 lives in Wisconsin. The death rate is steady at 0.84% after falling from 0.86 percent over the weekend. After the state’s report, Appleton Public Health confirmed 2 COVID-19 deaths in Outagamie County, and the Winnebago County Health Department reported two COVID-19 deaths in its jurisdiction occurred Sunday.

Hospitalizations also reached an all-time high with a total 2,274 currently hospitalized for COVID-19, including a record 456 in ICU. Previously, the most COVID-19 patients hospitalized at one time was 2,102 on Nov. 11.

Over the past 7 days, the state has averaged 6,427 confirmed cases, with 35.39% of tests coming back positive; 46 people dying; and 223 people hospitalized every day.

A total 316,758 people have tested positive for the COVID-19 in Wisconsin. Over the weekend, the state passed 2 million people testing negative, and Monday that figure was 2,009,148. That means 40% of the population of Wisconsin has been tested for COVID-19 over the past 9 months, with more than 5% of the population testing positive, based on the U.S. Census Bureau population estimate of 5,822,000 in 2019.

More than 70,000 people (70,205) are still considered active cases, or 22.2% of all known coronavirus cases since February 5. That percentage is down from 22.3%. There are 243,841 people past the 30-day standard or who were medically cleared, or 77% of cases.

HOSPITAL READINESS

The state reported another 118 people were hospitalized in the past 24 hours. To date, 14,499 people have been hospitalized for serious COVID-19 symptoms, or 4.6% of all known coronavirus cases.

The Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) says the state’s 134 hospitals had a total 168 open ICU beds, or 11.5% of all the ICU beds. In all, 12.6% of the state’s ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation beds are open. That doesn’t necessarily mean they’re all available to patients if hospitals don’t have staffing to support them.

The WHA further reports 9 ICU beds vacant in the Fox Valley region’s 13 hospitals which serve 8 counties. That’s 8.7% of ICU beds in the region. Overall, there are 75 beds open, or 8.8% of all beds. The hospitals are treating 135 COVID-19 patients, including 14 in ICU.

The Northeast region has 13 ICU beds open among the 10 hospitals serving 7 counties, or 6.3% of ICU beds, with 15.9% of all beds open. Those hospitals are caring for 207 COVID-19 patients — 29 more than Sunday — with 47 in ICU.

Changes in hospitalization figures take hospital discharges and deaths into account.

The WHA says 25 of the 134 hospitals report less than a 7-day supply of gowns and 14 have less than a week’s supply of paper medical masks.

MONDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold.)*

Wisconsin*

  • Adams – 852 cases (+8) (6 deaths)
  • Ashland – 514 cases (+13) (6 deaths)
  • Barron – 2,721 cases (+80) (30 deaths)
  • Bayfield – 543 cases (+17) (6 deaths)
  • Brown – 19,865 cases (+22) (121 deaths)
  • Buffalo – 583 cases (+14) (3 deaths)
  • Burnett – 547 cases (+3) (7 deaths)
  • Calumet – 3,586 cases (+48) (21 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 3,580 cases (+69) (41 deaths) (+3)
  • Clark – 1,697 cases (+18) (24 deaths)
  • Columbia – 2,767 cases (+53) (10 deaths)
  • Crawford – 687 cases (+20) (4 deaths)
  • Dane – 22,223 cases (+503) (61 deaths)
  • Dodge – 6,778 cases (+116) (53 deaths)
  • Door – 1,396 cases (+11) (10 deaths)
  • Douglas – 1,352 cases (+37) (1 death)
  • Dunn – 2,063 cases (+80) (3 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 6,149 cases (+284) (42 deaths) (+2)
  • Florence – 273 cases (+2) (11 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 7,096 cases (+95) (34 deaths)
  • Forest – 645 cases (+3) (12 deaths)
  • Grant – 2,933 cases (+23) (52 deaths)
  • Green – 1,407 cases (+17) (5 deaths)
  • Green Lake – 1,062 cases (+14) (4 deaths)
  • Iowa – 976 cases (+11) (4 deaths)
  • Iron – 299 cases (5 deaths)
  • Jackson – 1,262 cases (+34) (3 deaths) (+1)
  • Jefferson – 4,279 cases (+38) (30 deaths)
  • Juneau – 1,610 cases (+52) (6 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 7,510 cases (+97) (109 deaths) (+1)
  • Kewaunee – 1,435 cases (13 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 6,449 cases (+164) (30 deaths)
  • Lafayette – 924 cases (+11) (2 deaths)
  • Langlade – 1,379 cases (+14) (21 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 1,560 cases (+29) (16 deaths) (+1)
  • Manitowoc – 4,100 cases (+58) (29 deaths)
  • Marathon – 8,200 cases (+131) (96 deaths)
  • Marinette – 2,525 cases (+29) (22 deaths)
  • Marquette – 932 cases (+7) (7 deaths)
  • Menominee – 497 cases (2 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 56,485 (+567) (643 deaths)
  • Monroe – 1,959 cases (+39) (11 deaths)
  • Oconto – 2,804 cases (+20) (21 deaths)
  • Oneida – 1,924 cases (+48) (22 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 12,254 cases (+137) (100 deaths)
  • Ozaukee – 3,835 cases (+22) (29 deaths)
  • Pepin – 359 cases (1 death) (cases revised -1 by state)
  • Pierce – 1,514 cases (+34) (9 deaths)
  • Polk – 1,582 cases (+81) (4 deaths)
  • Portage – 4,069 cases (+78) (30 deaths)
  • Price – 582 cases (+5) (3 deaths)
  • Racine – 11,393 cases (+98) (140 deaths)
  • Richland – 726 cases (+12) (10 deaths)
  • Rock – 7,897 cases (+190) (60 deaths)
  • Rusk – 617 cases (+25) (5 deaths)
  • Sauk – 2,964 cases (+45) (10 deaths)
  • Sawyer – 660 cases (+13) (5 deaths)
  • Shawano – 3,345 cases (+18) (41 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 7,225 cases (+3) (43 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 3,447 cases (+106) (18 deaths)
  • Taylor – 883 cases (+31) (10 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 1,745 cases (+53) (7 deaths)
  • Vernon – 855 cases (+31) (5 deaths)
  • Vilas – 990 cases (+25) (9 deaths)
  • Walworth – 4,812 cases (+19) (43 deaths)
  • Washburn – 467 cases (+15) (2 deaths)
  • Washington – 7,065 cases (+42) (58 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 19,074 cases (+266) (163 deaths)
  • Waupaca – 3,347 cases (+15) (71 deaths) (+4)
  • Waushara – 1,601 cases (+7) (6 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 11,880 cases (+99) (91 deaths)
  • Wood – 3,142 cases (+30) (17 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula (updates for Sunday – Monday) **

  • Alger – 126 cases (+3) (1 death)
  • Baraga – 278 cases (+18) (5 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 237 cases (+11) (2 deaths)
  • Delta – 1,848 cases (+38) (46 deaths)
  • Dickinson – 1,307 cases (+118) (26 deaths)
  • Gogebic – 481 cases (+13) (9 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,077 cases (+33) (8 deaths)
  • Iron – 592 cases (+22) (28 deaths) (+1)
  • Keweenaw – 40 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Luce – 105 cases (+2)
  • Mackinac – 177 cases (+5)
  • Marquette – 1,962 cases (+112) (22 deaths)
  • Menominee – 979 cases (+33) (11 deaths) (+1)
  • Ontonagon – 221 cases (+10) (6 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft – 147 cases (+1) (1 death) (+1)

* Viewers have asked us why the state has different numbers than what’s reported on some county health department websites. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19 but would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Health experts say face masks are still the most effective way the general public can slow the spread of the coronavirus, but only if the masks are worn appropriately — over the nose and chin. County and state health officials are reminding and urging people to stay home when they feel sick, avoid large gatherings, and distance yourself six feet from people who aren’t from your household.

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services has a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. The tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.

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