Less than 3,000 new coronavirus cases reported Sunday

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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – For the third time this month, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services reports fewer than 3,000 people have tested positive for the coronavirus within a 24 hour period. Previously, the state reported fewer than 3,000 new cases on December sixth and seventh. That happened only twice during the entire month of November – once on the day after Thanksgiving, and also on November 30th.

State health officials say out of 12,175 new test results released Sunday, 2,757 people tested positive for the coronavirus, which causes COVID-19. That is a percentage rate of 22.64%, the first time that figure has been below 25% since November 27th, which was the day after Thanksgiving. Many testing sites were closed during that holiday weekend.

The other 9,418 test results released Sunday were negative. The seven day average has dropped daily since December 8th, and is now at 3,514 a day, which equals 31.50%.

State health officials reported new cases in all Wisconsin counties except for Iron, Pepin and Price Counties.

Since February 5, more than 430,000 people (436,773) in Wisconsin have tested positive for the coronavirus which causes COVID-19. Another 2,250,766 have tested negative.

Currently, there are 45,987 active cases diagnosed in the last 30 days who haven’t been medically cleared, which is 10.5% of all cases dating back to February. That’s a decrease from Saturday’s percentage of 11.1%. Another 386,655 (88.5%) are considered recovered. The DHS says that general “recovered” category includes some people still feel lingering effects from their COVID-19 infection.

State health officials say another 15 people have died from COVID-19 within the past 24 hours, bringing the cumulative death toll to 4,056. The state crossed the milestone of 4,000 deaths from COVID-19 Saturday.

New deaths were reported in Ashland, Brown, Chippewa, Dane, Kenosha, Milwaukee, Sheboygan, Taylor, Vernon, Washington and Waukesha Counties.

The state is averaging 48 COVID-19 deaths a day over the past 7 days, a figure that held steady from Saturday. That number had dropped from Friday’s average of 52. The seven day average of deaths was fewer than 50 for the first time since December 3 on Saturday. However, the death rate continues to hold steady at 0.93% after climbing there Thursday. The death rate had fallen to a low of 0.84% on November 18.

Cases and deaths by county in Wisconsin are listed later in this article.

The first shipments of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine began Sunday. The shipments, which officials say will be staggered, will arrive at 145 distribution centers Monday, with another 425 sites getting shipments Tuesday, and the remaining 66 on Wednesday.

RELATED: COVID-19 vaccine shipments begin in historic US effort

RELATED: EXPLAINER: How much COVID-19 vaccine will be shipped in US

HOSPITALIZATIONS

On Sunday, the state reported 87 more people hospitalized for serious COVID-19 symptoms since Saturday’s report, bringing the total number of people ever hospitalized for COVID-19 to 19,249, or 4.4% of all known cases. The 7-day average is 147.6 hospitalizations per day, so that metric is below average.

The latest numbers from the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA), 1,384 COVID-19 patients were hospitalized as of Saturday with 322 in intensive care. That’s down from a peak of 2,277 who were in hospitals on November 17.

The Fox Valley’s 13 hospitals are currently treating 84 COVID-19 patients, including 12 in intensive care. The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals have 10297 COVID-19 patients, 23 in ICU.

The alternate care facility at the state fairgrounds was treating 7 patients Sunday, one less than Saturday. The field hospital takes patients who are close to being released from the hospital but not quite ready, such as those who are ambulatory but still need oxygen, to ease the caseload at overwhelmed hospitals.

HOSPITAL READINESS – these figures will be updated when the WHA updates its numbers later this afternoon

According to the WHA, statewide there are 229 ICU beds open, which is 15.62% of all the intensive care beds, and 1,911 of all types of medical beds are open, or 17.10%.

The Fox Valley region, which serves 8 counties, has 20 ICU beds (19.23%) and 11.95% of all beds open. The Northeast region, serving 7 counties, has 45 ICU beds (21.73%) and 21.44% of all beds open.

These beds are for all patients, not just COVID-19, and whether a bed can be filled depends on whether the hospital has the necessary medical and support staff.

The need for personal protective equipment (PPE) remains unchanged from Friday. Eighteen of the state’s 134 hospitals have less than a week’s supply of gowns, 13 are short on paper medical masks, 11 have less than 7 days’ worth of goggles, and 9 are in need of N95 masks.

SUNDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold)

Wisconsin*

  • Adams – 1,187 cases (+6) (10 deaths)
  • Ashland – 874 cases (+10) (13 deaths)(+1)
  • Barron – 4,021 cases (+20) (50 deaths)
  • Bayfield – 819 cases (+14) (16 deaths)
  • Brown – 24,332 cases (+55) (150 deaths)(+1)
  • Buffalo – 904 cases (+4) (6 deaths)
  • Burnett – 912 cases (+17) (15 deaths)
  • Calumet – 4,381 cases (+25) (30 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 5,424 cases (+16) (60 deaths) (+1)
  • Clark – 2,506 cases (+12) (44 deaths)
  • Columbia – 3,867 cases (+25) (19 deaths)
  • Crawford – 1,463 cases (+12) (10 deaths)
  • Dane – 30,474 cases (+224) (113 deaths)(+1)
  • Dodge – 9,674 cases (+38) (87 deaths)
  • Door – 1,786 cases (+8) (11 deaths)
  • Douglas – 2,619 cases (+24) (14 deaths)
  • Dunn – 3,156 cases (+29) (18 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 8,486 cases (+32) (65 deaths)
  • Florence – 377 cases (+2) (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 9,579 cases (+26) (59 deaths)
  • Forest – 782 cases (+1) (20 deaths)
  • Grant – 3,838 cases (+11) (70 deaths)
  • Green – 2,012 cases (+17) (8 deaths)
  • Green Lake – 1,287 cases (+12) (9 deaths)
  • Iowa – 1,483 cases (+7) (5 deaths)
  • Iron – 398 cases (10 deaths)
  • Jackson – 2,062 cases (+6) (6 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 6,007 cases (+51) (45 deaths)
  • Juneau – 2,180 cases (+20) (8 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 10,915 cases (+98) (178 deaths) (+1)
  • Kewaunee – 1,839 cases (+6) (22 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 9,116 cases (+48) (43 deaths)
  • Lafayette – 1,151 cases (+7) (4 deaths)
  • Langlade – 1,658 cases (+5) (29 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 2,191 cases (+15) (36 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 5,500 cases (+30) (47 deaths)
  • Marathon – 10,930 cases (+77) (142 deaths)
  • Marinette – 3,291 cases (+15) (36 deaths)
  • Marquette – 1,100 cases (+5) (15 deaths)
  • Menominee – 642 cases (+4) (8 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 77,118 (+604) (815 deaths) (+3)
  • Monroe – 3,043 cases (+15) (20 deaths)
  • Oconto – 3,493 cases (+12) (33 deaths)
  • Oneida – 2,609 cases (+19) (46 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 14,933 cases (+39) (141 deaths)
  • Ozaukee – 5,540 cases (+46) (43 deaths)
  • Pepin – 570 cases (5 deaths)
  • Pierce – 2,593 cases (+23) (21 deaths)
  • Polk – 2,658 cases (+29) (20 deaths)
  • Portage – 5,119 cases (+24) (43 deaths)
  • Price – 850 cases (4 deaths)
  • Racine – 15,759 cases (+92) (221 deaths)
  • Richland – 974 cases (+4) (13 deaths)
  • Rock – 10,890 cases (+238) (102 deaths)
  • Rusk – 1,013 cases (+6) (11 deaths)
  • Sauk – 4,035 cases (+33) (21 deaths)
  • Sawyer – 1,049 cases (+7) (8 deaths)
  • Shawano – 3,903 cases (+16) (53 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 10,207 cases (79 deaths)(+1)
  • St. Croix – 4,903 cases (+53) (22 deaths)
  • Taylor – 1,461 cases (+7) (13 deaths)(+1)
  • Trempealeau – 2,712 cases (+4) (24 deaths)
  • Vernon – 1,332 cases (+16) (17 deaths)(+1)
  • Vilas – 1,429 cases (+7) (19 deaths)
  • Walworth – 6,888 cases (+37) (70 deaths)
  • Washburn – 886 cases (+17) (7 deaths)
  • Washington – 10,321 cases (+94) (87 deaths)(+1)
  • Waukesha – 30,299 cases (+200) (282 deaths) (+3)
  • Waupaca – 3,899 cases (+7) (92 deaths)
  • Waushara – 1,830 cases (+8) (13 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 14,231 cases (+48) (137 deaths)
  • Wood – 5,003 cases (+38) (31 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

  • Alger – 177 cases (1 death)
  • Baraga – 460 cases (26 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 454 cases (8 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,376 cases (53 deaths)
  • Dickinson – 1,858 cases (50 deaths)
  • Gogebic – 674 cases (12 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,478 cases (14 deaths)
  • Iron – 731 cases (32 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 67 cases (1 death)
  • Luce – 122 cases
  • Mackinac – 245 cases (1 death)
  • Marquette – 2,942 cases (42 deaths)
  • Menominee – 1,323 cases (22 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 270 cases (14 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft – 188 cases (2 deaths)

Last week, the DHS published a new, interactive map online that shows COVID-19 virus cases and deaths by county, municipality, ZIP Code or school district (CLICK HERE). You can view cases and deaths by total numbers or per capita or deaths as a percentage of total cases. Health Secretary-designee Andrea Palm says it “offers new ways for people to understand COVID-19 activity within their communities.”

* Viewers have asked us why the state has different numbers than what’s reported on some county health department websites. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19 but would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.



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