Almost half of results were positive Tuesday

[ad_1]

MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – The Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported the most COVID-19 deaths in almost a week, and nearly half of all coronavirus tests returned Tuesday came back positive.

The state received 7,299 results — 51 fewer than yesterday, and the fewest since Sept. 26. Of these, 3,501 came back positive, or 48% (47.97%). The remaining 3,798 were negative. Cases were reported in 71 of Wisconsin’s 72 counties.

Fifty-four more people were added to COVID-19′s death toll, bringing it to 4,122. These deaths were in 26 counties, with multiple deaths in 15 of them: Brown (3), Chippewa, Columbia, Dane (3), Dodge (3), Door, Grant (3), Jefferson (2), Kenosha (5), La Crosse (3), Marinette (2), Milwaukee (3), Oconto, Outagamie (2), Ozaukee, Pierce (2), Polk, Racine (4), Rock, Sauk, Sheboygan (3), Vernon (2), Walworth, Waukesha (5), Waupaca and Wood counties. Death totals were revised in Green and Pepin counties.

The death rate remains 0.93% of all known cases for a sixth straight day.

Wisconsin is averaging 3,421 new coronavirus cases and 45 COVID-19 deaths per day over the last 7 days. Both of these are down from Monday’s rolling average.

County case and death numbers appear later in this article.

To date, more than 46% of Wisconsin’s population has been tested for the coronavirus at least once, and 7.6% of the population tested positive. The DHS reports 442,396 people have tested positive for the coronavirus and two-and-a-quarter-million (2,259,792) tested negative.

One in 10 people ever diagnosed with the coronavirus in Wisconsin is still an active case: 44,076 people. The number of patients who are recovered is up to 394,095, which is 89.1%. The DHS points out a person may still suffer effects of their infection, such as “brain fog” or loss of taste or smell, even when they fall under the “recovered” category, which means they survived 30 days after diagnosis or onset of symptoms or were medically cleared.

Hospitals have begun receiving their share of the 49,725 doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine being shipped to Wisconsin this week. Health care providers and nursing homes staff and residents are first in line to receive them. CLICK HERE to read more about the distribution plans.

HOSPITALIZATIONS

The DHS reported 184 more COVID-19 patients sent to hospitals. That’s the most COVID-19 hospitalizations in 24 hours since last Wednesday, but the number of patients hospitalized decreased to 1,461 — 10 fewer than Monday. Changes in daily hospitalization figures take discharges and deaths into account. The number of those in intensive care increased, from 319 to 331, according to the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA).

An average 144 people have been hospitalized every day over the past 7 days. That moving average has been declining for the last 10 days.

The eight-county Fox Valley region currently has 86 COVID-19 patients (four fewer than Monday), with 15 in ICU (four more than Monday). The seven-county Northeast region has 107 patients (1 more than Monday), with 26 in ICU (one less than Monday).

The alternate care facility at the state fairgrounds was treating 6 patients Tuesday, the same as Monday. Through late last week, the field hospital had treated 156 people since opening on October 14.

HOSPITAL READINESS

The WHA reports 15% of intensive care beds and 16.3% of all hospital beds in the state’s 134 hospitals are open.

The Fox Valley region’s 13 hospitals have 19 ICU beds (18.3%) and 114 (13.4%) of all beds open among them. The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals have 36 ICU beds (17.4%) and 203 of all beds (21.2%) open.

These beds are for all patients, not just COVID-19, and whether a bed can be filled depends on whether the hospital has the necessary medical and support staff.

The need for personal protective equipment (PPE) remains unchanged from Monday: 18 hospitals report less than a 7-day supply of gowns, 13 have a short supply of paper medical masks, 11 are short on goggles, and 9 are low on N95 masks.

Article continues with county-by-county case totals below the video

TUESDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold)

Wisconsin*

  • Adams – 1,206 cases (+7) (10 deaths)
  • Ashland – 893 cases (+14) (13 deaths)
  • Barron – 4,050 cases (+7) (50 deaths)
  • Bayfield – 843 cases (+12) (16 deaths)
  • Brown – 24,547 cases (+208) (153 deaths) (+3)
  • Buffalo – 911 cases (+3) (6 deaths)
  • Burnett – 920 cases (+3) (15 deaths)
  • Calumet – 4,416 cases (+19) (30 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 5,476 cases (+13) (62 deaths) (+1)
  • Clark – 2,524 cases (+17) (44 deaths)
  • Columbia – 3,892 cases (+10) (20 deaths) (+1)
  • Crawford – 1,471 cases (+5) (11 deaths)
  • Dane – 30,682 cases (+29) (116 deaths) (+3)
  • Dodge – 9,724 cases (+27) (90 deaths) (+3)
  • Door – 1,791 cases (+5) (12 deaths) (+1)
  • Douglas – 2,697 cases (+54) (14 deaths)
  • Dunn – 3,182 cases (+17) (20 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 8,537 cases (+23) (65 deaths)
  • Florence – 380 cases (+1) (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 9,674 cases (+73) (59 deaths)
  • Forest – 783 cases (+3) (20 deaths)
  • Grant – 3,864 cases (+13) (73 deaths) (+3)
  • Green – 2,023 cases (+1) (7 deaths) (deaths revised -1 by state)
  • Green Lake – 1,300 cases (+12) (9 deaths)
  • Iowa – 1,503 cases (+12) (5 deaths)
  • Iron – 400 cases (+2) (10 deaths)
  • Jackson – 2,082 cases (+15) (6 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 6,079 cases (+38) (47 deaths) (+2)
  • Juneau – 2,209 cases (+10) (8 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 11,148 cases (+164) (183 deaths) (+5)
  • Kewaunee – 1,865 cases (+26) (22 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 9,220 cases (+74) (46 deaths) (+3)
  • Lafayette – 1,157 cases (+3) (4 deaths)
  • Langlade – 1,687 cases (+13) (29 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 2,215 cases (+9) (36 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 5,572 cases (+35) (47 deaths)
  • Marathon – 11,023 cases (+37) (142 deaths)
  • Marinette – 3,334 cases (+23) (38 deaths) (+2)
  • Marquette – 1,104 cases (+2) (15 deaths)
  • Menominee – 654 cases (+6) (9 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 78,267 (+722) (819 deaths) (+3)
  • Monroe – 3,084 cases (+24) (20 deaths)
  • Oconto – 3,523 cases (+2) (35 deaths) (+1)
  • Oneida – 2,624 cases (+8) (46 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 15,070 cases (+77) (143 deaths) (+2)
  • Ozaukee – 5,673 cases (+124) (44 deaths) (+1)
  • Pepin – 579 cases (+9) (4 deaths) (deaths revised -1 by state)
  • Pierce – 2,641 cases (+34) (23 deaths) (+2)
  • Polk – 2,713 cases (+26) (21 deaths) (+1)
  • Portage – 5,155 cases (+20) (43 deaths)
  • Price – 861 cases (+4) (4 deaths)
  • Racine – 16,021 cases (+215) (225 deaths) (+4)
  • Richland – 981 cases (+2) (13 deaths)
  • Rock – 10,959 cases (+35) (104 deaths) (+1)
  • Rusk – 1,022 cases (+8) (11 deaths)
  • Sauk – 4,051 cases (cases revised -10 by state) (22 deaths) (+1)
  • Sawyer – 1,070 cases (+11) (8 deaths)
  • Shawano – 3,928 cases (+14) (53 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 10,406 cases (+25) (82 deaths) (+3)
  • St. Croix – 4,978 cases (+55) (22 deaths)
  • Taylor – 1,475 cases (+5) (13 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 2,746 cases (+15) (24 deaths)
  • Vernon – 1,345 cases (+7) (19 deaths) (+2)
  • Vilas – 1,446 cases (+10) (19 deaths)
  • Walworth – 6,985 cases (+64) (71 deaths) (+1)
  • Washburn – 907 cases (+12) (8 deaths)
  • Washington – 10,497 cases (+168) (87 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 31,200 cases (+642) (289 deaths) (+5)
  • Waupaca – 3,915 cases (+15) (93 deaths) (+1)
  • Waushara – 1,839 cases (+9) (13 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 14,328 cases (+61) (138 deaths)
  • Wood – 5,069 cases (+44) (32 deaths) (+1)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

  • Alger – 177 cases (1 death)
  • Baraga – 452 cases (28 deaths) (+2)
  • Chippewa – 468 cases (+7) (8 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,396 cases (+2) (53 deaths)
  • Dickinson – 1,887 cases (+12) (52 deaths) (+1)
  • Gogebic – 684 cases (+4) (12 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,501 cases (+14) (17 deaths) (+3)
  • Iron – 734 cases (32 deaths) (cases revised -1 by state)
  • Keweenaw – 67 cases (1 death)
  • Luce – 122 cases
  • Mackinac – 247 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Marquette – 2,973 cases (+9) (47 deaths) (+3)
  • Menominee – 1,336 cases (+9) (22 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 272 cases (+1) (14 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft – 187 cases (2 deaths) (cases revised -1 by state)

Last week, the DHS published a new, interactive map online that shows COVID-19 virus cases and deaths by county, municipality, ZIP Code or school district (CLICK HERE). You can view cases and deaths by total numbers or per capita or deaths as a percentage of total cases. Health Secretary-designee Andrea Palm says it “offers new ways for people to understand COVID-19 activity within their communities.”

* Viewers have asked us why the state has different numbers than what’s reported on some county health department websites. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19 but would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.

[ad_2]
Source link

About doc

Check Also

What We Know So Far – NBC Chicago

[ad_1] Questions surrounding the coronavirus vaccine and allergic reactions heightened this week after a health …